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  • Development Contribution Guidelines 2013

    The Department of Environment, Community and Local Government have published guidelines for planning authority’s in relation to development contributions (planning levies).

    Key features of the new guidance include:

     1. A requirement for planning authorities to establish reduced rates of contribution for projects such as:

    • Developments in town centres
    • IDA/Enterprise Ireland projects
    • Broadband and sustainable energy infrastructure
    • Change of use permissions which do not require upgraded infrastructure.

    2. No exemption or waiver should apply to any applications for retention of development. Planning authorities are encouraged to impose higher rates in respect of such applications.

    3. Double charging is prohibited: Any development contribution already levied and paid in respect of a given development should be deducted from the subsequent charge so as to reflect that this development had already made a contribution.

    4. Development contribution schemes should appropriately promote the development of areas prioritised in their core strategies required  (eg: Incentivising activity through lower development contributions in the areas prioritised for development in the core strategy, with a complementary increase in the rate outside of these areas to ensure no shortfall in the council’s budget).

    Published on January 23, 2013 By:David Mulcahy · Filed under: Planning Guidelines; Tagged as: , ,
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